Wild Elephants Domesticating Themselves

Burst
Heptagram

Domestication selects animals suited for living among humans, favoring docility.

Domestication Explained

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Traits like shorter snouts, expressive faces, and prolonged infancy mark domestication.

The Domestication Syndrome

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Humans, like animals, may have self-domesticated for pro-social traits.

Human Self-Domestication

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Selection for less aggression led to changes in brain function and skull shape.

Evolutionary Shifts

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Bonobos show reduced aggression, similar to humans, suggesting self-domestication.

Similarities with Bonobos

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

A study proposes African and Asian elephants underwent self-domestication.

Elephants: A Case Study

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Changes in jaw and cranium shape, reduced teeth, and peaceful behavior align with self-domestication.

Evidence of Domestication

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Analysis suggests elephants have genes favoring domestication-related changes.

Genetic Insights

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Critics argue not all domestication traits are present in elephants, challenging the theory.

Continuing Debate

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

Self-domestication may extend to other social animals, reshaping our understanding of evolution.

Expanding the Concept

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke

The self-domestication hypothesis broadens our view of social evolution, highlighting shared traits across species.

Conclusion

Burst with Arrow
Thick Brush Stroke